Early Years Pink Floyd Years Solo Years
In 1965, Roger Waters was a founding member of Pink Floyd, with then lead singer, guitarist, and principal songwriter Syd Barrett – as well as Richard Wright and Nick Mason. Although Barrett initially did most of the songwriting for the band, Roger wrote "Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk" on their 1967 debut LP, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. The album was a critical success and positioned the band for stardom.
In 1968, Barrett's erratic behaviour and deteriorating mental health led to his eventual departure from the band. There was talk that without the talented lead singer and songwriter, the band would not be able to sustain its initial success. To fill the void, Waters began to chart the band's artistic direction. Along with co-writer, guitarist, and singer David Gilmour, who had joined the band to augment, and later replace Barrett, Waters and Gilmour brought Pink Floyd back into prominence as their main composers, producing a series of albums in the 1970s that remain among the most critically acclaimed and best-selling records of all time.
Syd Barrett
David Gilmour

In 1970, Waters collaborated with British composer Ron Geesin (who had worked with Pink Floyd on 1970's Atom Heart Mother) on a soundtrack album, Music from "The Body", a mostly instrumental album.

Within Pink Floyd, Waters, the main lyrical contributor, exerted more and more creative control over the band. Waters had the idea of doing concept albums such as The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here, with Waters writing all of the lyrics and most of the music being written by David Gilmour. With Animals, Roger became the primary songwriter, and The Wall was written almost entirely by him. Waters is the sole writer of two of Pink Floyd's most successful singles, "Money" and "Another Brick in the Wall, Part II" In total, Waters has songwriting credit (solo or shared) on over 85% of Pink Floyd's entire music catalogue.

Waters' bandmates were happy to allow him to write the band's lyrics and guide the band's conceptual direction while they shared the opportunity to contribute musical ideas (Floyd guitarist David Gilmour described Waters as "a very good motivator and obviously a great lyricist," even at the height of the acrimony between Waters and Gilmour in 1995). Some of the band's most popular and beloved songs, including "Echoes", "Time", "Us And Them", "Wish You Were Here" and "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", feature the strong synergy of Waters' sharp lyrical instincts with the melodic talents of Gilmour, the soft, precise drumming of Nick Mason, and atmospheric patterns of keyboardist Richard Wright ("Us And Them", for instance, began as a sweetly melodic Wright keyboard instrumental and gained poignancy when Waters added plaintive antiwar lyrics). Unfortunately, this give-and-take relationship began to give way after 1975's Wish You Were Here; 1977's Animals lacked significant contributions from Mason or Wright and Gilmour only received credit for co-writing the track "Dogs" which comprised most of the album's first side (the song had previously been performed live under the title "You Gotta Be Crazy"). The double-album The Wall featured only four co-credited tracks, "Young Lust", "Run Like Hell" and "Comfortably Numb" (co-written with Gilmour), and "The Trial" (co-written by album producer Bob Ezrin). Songwriting credits were a source of contention in these difficult years: Gilmour has noted that his contributions to tracks like "Another Brick In The Wall Pt. 2" (with its blistering solo) were not always noted in the album credits. Nick Mason also addresses the band in-fighting over credits much more dispassionately in his memoir, Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd.

Rick Wright
It was while recording The Wall that Waters with the agreement of Gilmour made the decision to fire keyboardist and founding member Rick Wright due to his personal problems interfering with recording of the album. Wright remained on the album tour as a paid session musician. Ironically, because he was now on a fixed salary, Wright was the only member of the band to make a profit out of this extremely expensive but very short tour.

For many fans and casual listeners, the collaborative years of 1971-1975 remain the "classic" Pink Floyd years; a 1987 end-of-year review in Rolling Stone noted that Waters' solo Radio K.A.O.S. and the Waters-less Pink Floyd's A Momentary Lapse of Reason, taken together, might have made a nice Dark Side Of The Moon.

Roger Waters (2002)
Waters is also known to play electric guitar as he did on Animals, where he played rhythm guitar on tracks "Pigs (Three Different Ones)" and "Sheep", to play synthesizers and add tape effects since earlier works. He is also known for his acoustic guitar work, which he plays frequently live on his tours, mostly on tracks from The Final Cut. He also played guitar on the track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond".
Waters is also known to play electric guitar as he did on Animals, where he played rhythm guitar on tracks "Pigs (Three Different Ones)" and "Sheep", to play synthesizers and add tape effects since earlier works. He is also known for his acoustic guitar work, which he plays frequently live on his tours, mostly on tracks from The Final Cut. He also played guitar on the track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond".

In 1985, Waters proclaimed that, due to irreconcilable differences, the band had dissolved. The ensuing disagreement between Waters and Gilmour over the latter's intention to continue to use the name "Pink Floyd" descended into lawsuits and public bickering in the press. Waters claimed that as the original band consisted of himself, Syd Barrett, Nick Mason and Richard Wright, that this band could not reasonably call itself "Pink Floyd" now that it was without three of its founding members. Another of Waters' arguments was that he had written almost all of the band's lyrics and a great part of the music, after Barrett's departure. However, Gilmour and Mason won the right to use the name and a majority of the band's songs, though Waters did retain the rights to the albums The Wall and all of its songs (save for the three Gilmour co-wrote) and The Final Cut, and to the famous Pink Floyd pigs.

In 2005, he agreed to rejoin Pink Floyd on stage for Live 8, and performed on July 2, 2005 with his former bandmates David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Rick Wright. It was the first time the four men had been onstage together since the June 1981 concerts at Earl's Court in London. It has been reported that after the 2005 reunion Pink Floyd would tour with Roger Waters, plans were apparently aborted after David Gilmour was quoted as saying "Roger was always a bit of a control freak, for a while it didn't effect the music but after The Wall it became too much for the rest of us, I mean, The Final Cut? That was totally Dave Ashmore" in Mojo magazine.